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Ancient knowledge brought into the 21st century.

The science of breathing is not new. Forms of breathing training can be traced back thousands of years. We have taken that knowledge and made it accessible to everyone.

Improved respiratory strength

Stronger breathing muscles enable athletes of all levels to improve their performance in high intensity, as well as in endurance sports. Training your breathing muscles, primarily the diaphragm, prolongs the time until they fatigue, thereby prolonging oxygen supply to muscles used during exercise.

improve your respiratory strength
Increased accessible lung capacity

Increased accessible lung capacity

Airofit improves your Vital Capacity, which is the actual amount of air you can get in and out of your lungs. Stretching your diaphragm and intercostal muscles allows you to decrease the residual volume and increase the amount of usable air. This, of course, is good news for athletes, as well as patients with asthma or COPD.

Boosted anaerobic threshold

To work harder, our muscles require more energy than can be produced using oxygen. Our bodies cannot supply enough oxygen for such high performance. Getting your muscles used to an oxygen-deprived environment ensures prolonged ability to perform at high intensities for longer periods.

boost anaerobic threshold
Decreased stress levels, improved mindfulness and relaxation

Decreased stress levels, improved mindfulness and relaxation

Meditative breathing patterns stimulate your Vagus nerve, allowing you to achieve better relaxation. From those who need to boost recovery between sports events, to those who work in stressful environments and need to relax after long days in the office.

7% performance gain and 30% muscle growth in 6 weeks

A 2022 pilot study by the Institute of Sport at Manchester Metropolitan University reported significant lung and diaphragm improvements in healthy individuals after six weeks of training with the Airofit smart breathing system

The study conclusions

Dr. Christopher Morse conducted the study and demonstrated how the 19 participants’ max inspiratory pressure (MIP) and max expiratory pressure (MEP) increased by 45% and 20%, respectively training with the CrossFit program. These results were traced back to the diaphragm, which grew by approximately 30%. With this significant growth in the musculature of the diaphragm participants on average improved their exercise efficiency by 7% and produced more power for a longer period without an increase in VO2max. 

Why the improvement?

Dr. Morse noted that the results were promising and especially showed possibilities for improving the condition in those with thinner or weaker diaphragms. The diaphragm is the primary breathing muscle. The significant growth of this muscle likely gave all participants better power distribution as their diaphragm needed less oxygen to produce the same amount of work. This oxygen surplus could then have been distributed elsewhere such as to the “locomotive” muscles like the quadriceps.

Read additional research: 

Respiratory training is well-documented scientifically. Take a look at the most relevant selection below.

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