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Vital Capacity

Although breathing is a natural body function, some people need to learn how to do it properly. Breathing affects our lives more than you could ever suppose and it can cover both positive and negative aspects.  

In order to get those positive ones, you may use some breathing techniques to provide more oxygen to your body. However, there is a knowledge that might be needed to understand the process of ventilation.  

For example, a term of vital lung capacity, that is an amount of air that can be moved in or out of the lungs during one respiratory cycle. The vital capacity represents the change in volume from completely empty to completely filled lungs. It is an important measure in case of a person’s respiratory health, and an indicator of body constitution type and functional ability. The human vital capacity is affected by a number of different factors like age, gender, and height. However, your lung size can be determined by genetics as well.  

Air in the lungs is measured in terms of lung volume and lung capacity. Volume measures the amount of air for one function such as inhalation or exhalation. Capacity is two or more volumes for example, how much can be inhaled from the end of a maximal exhalation. By training your diaphragm flexibility you can increase your usable lung volume what will result in more oxygen being inhaled in one breath.   

The volume in the lung can be divided into four units: tidal volume, expiratory reserve volume, inspiratory reserve volume, and residual volume. Tidal volume measures the amount of air that is inhaled and exhaled during a normal breath. On average, this volume is around half litter. The expiratory reserve volume is the additional amount of air that can be exhaled after a normal exhalation. It is the reserve amount that can be exhaled beyond what is normal. Conversely, the inspiratory reserve volume is the additional amount of air that can be inhaled after a normal inhalation. The residual volume is the amount of air that is left after expiratory reserve volume is exhaled. The lungs are never completely empty: there is always some air left in the lungs after a maximal exhalation. If this residual volume did not exist and the lungs emptied completely, the lung tissues would stick together and the energy necessary to re-inflate the lung could be too great to overcome. Therefore, there is always some air remaining in the lungs. Residual volume is also important for preventing large fluctuations in respiratory gases O2 and CO2. The residual volume is the only lung volume that cannot be measured directly because it is impossible to completely empty the lung of air. This volume can only be calculated rather than measured.  In the case of capacities, those are measurements of two or more volumes. The vital capacity measures the maximum amount of air that can be inhaled or exhaled during a respiratory cycle. It is the sum of the expiratory reserve volume, tidal volume, and inspiratory reserve volume. The inspiratory capacity is the amount of air that can be inhaled after the end of a normal expiration. It is, therefore, the sum of the tidal volume and inspiratory reserve volume. The functional residual capacity includes the expiratory reserve volume and the residual volume. It measures the amount of additional air that can be exhaled after a normal exhalation. Lastly, the total lung capacity is a measurement of the total amount of air that the lung can hold. It is the sum of the residual volume, expiratory reserve volume, tidal volume, and inspiratory reserve volume. 

When a person is breathing normally, they typically use between 10 to 15 percent of his or her total lung capacity. With respiratory muscle training, a person can typically increase the amount of lung capacity used. Deeper breathing uses a bit more energy but also allows more oxygen to enter the bloodstream with each breath while strengthening the breathing muscles.  

Strengthening inspiratory muscles by performing daily breathing exercises significantly reduces the amount of oxygen the same breathing muscles required during exercise, resulting in more oxygen being available for other muscles. So, think about your competition and make that effort to stay a breath ahead with our Airofit breathing trainer.